Comparisons
Comparisons Between Two Things or People

When comparing two things or people, use more or the
–er (comparative) form. It is correct to use the word the
before a comparative form, but it is not necessary.

Both books were interesting, but the one with case
studies was
more interesting to Pepe.
Both stores do good business, but the one
downtown is
busier.  
Of the two bridges, the new one is the
taller.

Comparisons Between Three or More Things or
People

When comparing three or more things or people, use most
or the
–est (superlative) form. The superlative form is
always preceded by the word the.

All things considered, Route 4 is the simplest way
to Farmington.
Four gymnasts tried out for the team, but only the
most accomplished athlete was accepted.
Spencer is the
youngest of Geneva’s seven
grandchildren.
Use more or the -er
form
to compare two
things or people; use
most or the -est form
to compare three or
more things or people.
Colombia is further
north than Bolivia.
Remember!
You may use the
word
the before a
comparative form,
but you
must use the
before a superlative
form.
Brazil is the largest
country in South
America.
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PRAXIS I tests understanding of comparisons in two ways: comparisons
between two things or people and comparisons between three or more things
or people.